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News

MCR LTER Co-PIs Peter Edmunds and Robert Carpenter receive NSF award to expand studies on ocean acidification (September 2014)

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded Moorea Coral Reef LTER site Co-PIs Robert Carpenter and Peter Edmunds nearly $1.9 million to further their study of the effects ocean acidification on coral reefs. The NSF grant for $1,892,911 will allow Carpenter and Edmunds to take their project to the next level. For the first time, a yearlong experiment will use replicated outdoor water flumes with different carbon dioxide treatments. Additionally, these experiments will be extended to the field to quantify the effects of reduced pH — the lower the pH level, the more acidic the water is — on fully intact reef systems off Moorea. For more information about this news item, please see the main story available on CSUN Today.

MCR LTER Investigator, Dr Ruth Gates awarded the Regents’ Medal for Excellence in Research (May 2014)

MCR LTER Investigator, Dr Ruth Gates has been awarded the Regents’ Medal for Excellence in Research by the University of Hawaii Board of Regents in recognition of scholarly contributions that expand the boundaries of knowledge and enrich the lives of students and the community.

Dr. Gates is a tenured researcher at the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology. She capitalizes on the combination of close proximity to living coral reefs and world-class research infrastructure to address questions on how corals and reefs function. Her work crosses spatial scales from molecules to ecosystems; it employs tools from the fields of molecular, cell and computational biology, biochemistry, physiology and ecology. Her goal is to build human, biological and educational capacity to slow and stop declines in reef integrity, and to improve the prognosis for coral reefs in the face of intensifying impacts from climate change and human use. She mentors postdoctoral fellows, graduate students and undergraduates, and works with a diversity of national and international collaborators that encompass biologists, engineers, writers and artists.

MCR LTER Co-PI Sally Holbrook wins Graduate Mentoring Award

Professor Sally Holbrook, Co-PI of both the Moorea Coral Reef and Santa Barbara Coastal Long Term Ecological Research sites and faculty member in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, & Marine Biology, was named the Outstanding Graduate Mentor for 2013-14 by the UCSB Academic Senate during an award ceremony held on Thursday, May 8th, 2014. Shown here with Dr Andrew Rassweiler, a former graduate student and now professional researcher with the UCSB Marine Science Institute. Professor Holbrook has chaired or co-chaired 21 PhD dissertation committees and 12 Masters theses. She also has served on an additional 21 doctoral and 5 Masters committees.

Professor Holbrook’s success as a mentor can be measured using several metrics: through the financial support that she offers graduate students from her grants or assistance in writing new proposals; in the quality of research that her students generate (reflected by the excellent publication record of her students); and by the professional success of her students. One of her colleagues makes particular note of "the wide range of high profile career positions occupied by her former students including: professors and researchers at major universities, fisheries biologists in government agencies, biological consultants in private industry, educators and directors at public aquaria and non-profit organizations, and government administrators (e.g., the Program Examiner for NOAA in the White House Office of Management and Budget in Washington, D.C, and the West Coast Regional Director for the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries)." In fact, one of her mentees is a departmental colleague (and was the department chair), and another is a recipient of this year’s Distinguished Teaching Award. Congratulations Sally!!!


Earth Day Festival (April 26-27, 2014)

MCR and SBC LTER graduate and undergraduate students hosted an informational booth featuring MCR site science at the 2014 Santa Barbara Earth Day Festival. Designed to raise public awareness about the current status and trends of coral and temperate reefs worldwide, younger visitors to the exhibit enjoyed reef related games and crafts while older visitors were offered an opportunity to speak with SBC and MCR LTER graduate students about a variety of issues affecting coastal ecosystems. One of the largest Earth Day festivals held each year in the US, this year's two day Santa Barbara Earth Day festival attracted over 37 thousand visitors. For more information about the 2104 Santa Barbara Earth Day festival, visit http://SBEarthDay.org/.

MCR Post-Doc publishes for a young audience (April, 2014)

Children's book 'Kupe and the Corals' is featured in an article in the LTER Network News here. Written by Jacqueline L. Padilla-Gamiño and beautifully illustrated by Majorie Leggitt, this book is the newest in the LTER Children's Book Series.

MCR Professor Emeritus featured in Natural History (March 2014)

The long term survey begun by ecologist Joseph H. Connell in 1963 and carried on by the current generation is featured in an article in the March 2014 issue of Natural History (pdf). Originally studying the reefs, "like corals, rainforest plant communities contain a high diversity of sessile organisms, so the fates of individuals can be tracked over time."


Ninth Annual MCR LTER All-Investigator Meeting (October 17-18, 2013)

The Ninth Annual MCR LTER All-Investigator meeting brought together investigators, postdoctoral scholars, graduate and undergraduate students, technicians and information managers from multiple disciplines across the country to UCSB to discuss their collaborative research on coral reef ecology. The two-day meeting began with a welcome and overview of the MCR LTER project by Lead Investigator, Russ Schmitt. Research presentation followed and focused on research related to the two current overarching themes of the MCR LTER program: ‘Resilience of Contemporary Reefs’ and ‘Reefs of the Future’.

Investigators and graduate students presented their research on coral resilience ranging from community and population demographics to molecular and genetic connectivity of species in Mo’orea and the surrounding islands. Researchers seeking to understand the composition and structure of coral reefs in the future presented their research on coral physiology within the context of climate change and ocean acidification conditions.

Investigator Jim Hench led a special presentation on the upcoming MCR UNOLS Cruise for fall 2014. Collaborating investigator Ruth Gates from the University of Hawaii also presented on an exciting new project called the EarthCube Initiative, an online data management system that allows unprecedented data sharing for coral reef systems science.

MCR LTER Mid-Term Review Site Visit a Success (July, 2013)

Thank you to all those who helped organize this event. A team of five reviewers and a program officer from NSF traveled to Moorea for presentations and field trips July 11-12. Examination of the field sites on the east shore and north shore required snorkel gear. Science presentations by investigators were followed by poster presentations by the graduate students.

LTER Cross-site Synthesis Workshop led by MCR Graduate Students (June, 2013)

A successful workshop was held at HJ Andrews LTER site where MCR graduate students Emily Rivest, Xueying Han, Samantha Davis and participants from five other LTER sites solidified the foci for two manuscripts. Their aim is to elucidate the utility of using indicators other than species abundance to detect and describe ecosystem transitions. This working group, formed at the September 2012 LTER All Scientists Meeting, is supported by the LTER Network Office and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.


Workshop on Racha Island (April-May, 2013)

In 2013, MCR received supplemental travel funds from NSF to hold a week-long workshop on Racha Island that would help establish a biological time series sampling program that produces data comparable to those collected by MCR and to engage in a capacity building effort to train 20 Thai marine scientists and graduate students in conceptual and practical issues underpinning long term, site-based research on resilience on coral reefs. Funding was awarded to the Lead PI of the Racha Island site, Dr. Mullica Jaroensutasinee (Walailak University) by Thailand’s National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA) to defray workshop costs. Eight MCR personnel conducted the workshop (3 investigators, 4 graduate students, and 1 technician). The event is posted on the Walailak University website and on a dedicated Facebook page.

MCR and SBC Host a Booth at 2013 Earth Day Festival (April 20-21, 2013)

MCR and SBC LTER scientists, graduate students, and outreach staff hosted a booth at the 2013 Santa Barbara Earth Day Festival to raise public awareness about MCR and SBC LTER research activities. This year's Earth Day festival attracted 35,894 people over its two day run. Visitors to the LTER booth were able to ask questions of SBC and MCR researchers and graduate students to view informational posters, and discuss research-related issues. Lead reef tech, Shannon Harrer, and SBC undergraduate students built a virtual kelp forest in which students acted as 'dive buddies' for children who toured the forest and collected data. For more information about Santa Barbara Earth Day 2013, visit http://SBEarthDay.org/.

Third Southern California LTER Graduate Student Symposium (March 2013)

CCE LTER hosted a graduate student symposium at Scripps Institute of Oceanography in La Jolla to promote collegial exchange of research results among the southern California LTER sites (SBC, MCR, and CCE). The participants are students at UC San Diego, UC Santa Barbara and Cal State Northridge, and are researching marine ecosystems in the Antarctic, French Polynesia and southern California. The symposium's format allowed for both oral and poster presentations, and also allowed students to begin developing their future collaborations. Presenters posed topics for further collaboration and/or in areas where they would benefit from additional expertise. Accompanying this was discussion specifically on enhancing collaboration and interaction among the marine LTER sites. These three LTER sites plan to continue their regular graduate symposium.

Eighth Annual MCR LTER All-Investigator Meeting (November 15-16, 2012)

All investigators, postdoctoral scholars, graduate students, technicians and information manager gathered at UCSB for presentations in sessions integrating site science across all the disciplines. (See group pictures from all years.) The graduate students chose 'Introduction to Data Management' as their topic for their annual gathering just prior to the AIM. Teaching materials included a hands-on activity from the Kellog Biological Station LTER, a presentation from Virginia Coast LTER, and an original question-oriented exploration of data sharing and re-use.

MCR and SBC LTERs Co-Host a Family Passport Stop during the Santa Barbara Earth Day 2012 Celebration (April 21-22, 2012)

MCR and SBC LTER Scientists, Graduate Students, and Outreach staff hosted a booth at the Community Environmental Council's 2012 Santa Barbara Earth Day Festival on April 21st and 22nd to raise public awareness about MCR and SBC LTER research activities. The theme for this year's Earth Day was "Mobilize for the Earth" and the festival attracted 35,765 people over its two day run. As one of eight Family Passport stops, the combined MCR and SBC LTER booth invited festival goers to spin a giant "Wheel of Reef Risk" in order to learn more about the types of threats faced by the planet's coral reefs and what actions citizens can take locally to help counter these threats. Participants were able to ask questions of SBC and MCR researchers and graduate students, view informational posters, complete a coloring and word problem activity designed for children, and discuss research related issues. For more information about Santa Barbara Earth Day 2012, click here.

Washington Accelerated Elementary School Field Trip to the REEF (March 13, 2012)

120 fourth grade students and teachers from Pasadena, California's Washington Accelerated Elementary School journeyed to the REEF at UCSB as guests of the Moorea Coral Reef LTER on March 13th, 2012. The fourth graders enjoyed research presentations by MCR LTER gradute students Shirley Han, Jessica Nielsen and Sammy Davis and participated in three hands-on, group learning activities. Students examined and compared tropical and local animals maintained in the REEF touch tanks, explored the beach at Campus Point and participated in a game designed and led by MCR LTER graduate student Stella Swanson that was designed to teach the students about the importance of foundation species (giant kelp in the case of the local Santa Barbara Channel ecosystem and corals in the case of the coral reef ecosystem around Moorea) to other species within an ecosystem. For more information about the REEF, click here.

MCR LTER Lead PI speaks at NSF Mini-symposium (March 1, 2012)

Russ Schmitt presented 'Managing for Resilience in Benthic Marine Environments' at the 2012 NSF Mini-symposium. View the 26 minute recorded presentation, complete with slides. Many ecologial systems can suddenly shift from one state to another and that alternate states can then provide substantially fewer ecosystem services. Some shifts are difficult to reverse. We need to forecast these changes and understand the reversiblity of these changes. The LTER has made substantial contributions to understanding state changes. This presentation drew from six different LTER sites to highlight a few of those contributions.

Powerhouse by the Sea: Marine Science Institute Recognized as Leader in Ocean Sciences (UC Santa Barbara Today, Fall, 2011)

From its humble beginnings in ramshackle trailers at Campus Point in the early 1970's, UC Santa Barbara's Marine Science Institute has grown into one of the most powerful incubators of marine research in the world. On any given day, you might find Marine Science Institute researchers off the coast of Moorea, in the icy waters of Antarctica, on the arctic tundra of Alaska or Greenland, in the highest elevations ofthe Sierra Nevada, in the watersheds of the Santa Ynez Mountains, or off the coast of Santa Barbara. They might be studying kelp forests, judging the impact of ocean acidification, searching for ocean viruses, or monitoring marine protected areas. To read more, click here.

'Lawnmower' Fish Preserve Pacific Coral (November 14, 2011)

UC SANTA BARBARA (US) — Some coral reefs are able to recover from cyclones and predators because of hungry fish that chow down on threatening algae, keeping it cropped to levels low enough to allow baby coral to settle and grow. In many cases, especially in the case of severely damaged reefs in the Caribbean, coral reefs that suffer large losses of live coral often become overgrown with algae and never return to a state where the reefs are again largely covered by live coral. To read more, click here.

Seventh Annual MCR LTER All-Investigator Meeting (November 8-9, 2011)

MCR LTER investigators, postdoctoral scholars, graduate students, technicians and information manager gathered at UCSB for presentations in sessions integrating site science across all the disciplines: 'Fluxes and Connectivity', 'Reef Disturbance and Resilience', and 'Coral Reefs of the Future'. (See group pictures from all years.) A collaborator from outside the LTER gave a talk showing how MCR LTER coral photo surveys have been used to further computer-aided image recognition.

Annual LTER IMC meeting hosted in Santa Barbara (September 26-27, 2011)

The LTER Information Managers Committee (IMC) gathered in Santa Barbara for their annual meeting and the 2011 Environmental Information Management Conference (EIMC). The EIMC is co-hosted by LTER as a mechanism to share knowledge among information managers from many agencies and research groups. A variety of topics - both LTER-specific and general - were featured through a mixed venue of workshops, oral presentations, demonstrations and posters. Local information managers Margaret O'Brien (SBC) and M. Gastil-Buhl (MCR) acted as hosts for their colleagues. For more information on the EIMC 2011 click here.

Focus on Moorea Microbes

MIRADA LTERs is carrying out a Microbial Biodiversity Survey and Inventory across all the major aquatic (marine and freshwater) Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) sites established by the NSF’s US LTER Program. Their inventory takes advantage of the aquatic sampling locations that are part of the established LTER network of sites and builds on existing infrastructure for coordination at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) in Woods Hole, Massachusetts. MIRADA LTERs featured the MCR LTER and Craig Carlson’s microbe research in the first of their outreach podcast series. To watch the podcast, click here.

MCR Investigators in the News (February and April, 2011)

CNN recently featured a global scientific field study from the journal PlosBiology suggesting that the most diverse coral reef fish systems are the most impaired by human populations. MCR data was used in the analysis. Additionally, National Geographic interviewed MCR deputy director Andrew Brooks and lead principal investigator Russell Schmitt in an article discussing research applications of the Moorea BIOCODE project. The CNN story can be found here and the National Geographic story can be found here.

MCR LTER Hosts Booth at Earth Day Festival (April 16-17th, 2011)

MCR and SBC LTER scientists, graduate students, and Outreach staff shared a booth at the Community Environmental Council's 2011 Santa Barbara Earth Day Festival on April 16th and 17th to raise awareness about LTER research. The theme for this year's Earth Day was "Powered by the People" and the festival attracted 38,214 people over two days. Participants were able to stop by to ask questions, view informational posters, complete a coloring and word problem activity, and discuss research related issues with MCR and SBC LTER representatives. For more information about Earth Day, click here and for a video interview with MCR graduate student Sammy Davis, click here.

Washington Accelerated Elementary School Field Trip to the REEF (March 30, 2011)

Washington Accelerated Elementary School fourth graders made the trip on March 30th from Pasadena, CA to the REEF at UCSB in collaboration with the Moorea Coral Reef LTER. The fourth graders enjoyed research presentations by MCR LTER gradute students Shirley Han, Emily Rivest and Sammy Davis. They also participated in hands on activities at the REEF touch tanks and at Campus Point beach. This field trip presents a hands-on conclusion to their life science unit. For more information about visiting the REEF, click here.

Joint SBC-MCR-CCE Graduate Student Symposium (February 4th, 2011)

Graduate student representatives from the 3 California LTER sites: Moorea Coral Reef, California Current Ecosystem, and Santa Barbara Coastal have organized a Graduate Student Symposium to promote collaboration among sites. The symposium will take place at UCSB's Marine Science Institute. Students will present their work in talks and posters. The program pdf, a group photo and video recordings of the talks are available.

Moorea and Santa Barbara LTER scientists tour Chinese marine ILTER sites (December 20th, 2010)

This August, six scientists from the Moorea Coral Reef (MCR) and Santa Barbara Coastal (SBC) LTER sites were hosted for two weeks by their colleagues in the People's Republic of China to discuss potential areas for cooperation with marine ILTER sites in the Chinese Ecosystem Research Network (CERN). To read the full article, click here.

Sixth Annual MCR LTER All-Investigator Meeting Gathers at UC Santa Barbara (November 8-9th, 2010)

On November 8-9, 2010, the MCR LTER site held its annual two day investigator meeting. MCR LTER Principal and Associate investigators, postdoctoral scholars, graduate students and technicians met to discuss results of time-series and process studies. (See the group picture.) Lead field technician Keith Seydel showed how the MCR LTER project leads in SCUBA diving statistics in this presentation.

New CRISP Field Guide Available (October 2010)

CRISP (Coral Reef InitiativeS for the Pacific) in New Caledonia has released a gorgeous new field guide called "A guide to the decapod crustaceans of the South Pacific," by Joseph Poupin and Matthieu Juncker (2010, 318 pp.). It is available online for free, and there is one edition in English, and another in French. You will find a number of other informative publications on a variety of reef topics as well at this web page, all free to download. To see the CRISP publications, click here.

Marine Life of Moorea Coloring Book Online (August 2010)

The new Marine Life of Moorea Coloring Book is now online and available to download here. This coloring book provides a fun way to learn about tropical marine animals, where they live and what they eat, while coloring pictures of common animals found in the coral reefs around Moorea.

Lesson Plan for Kindergarteners and 3rd Graders Now Available (July 2010)

A new lesson has been added to the Coral Reefs of Moorea education website for Kindergarten and Third Grade students and is available to download here. This lesson can be used as a fun craft for any age, or teachers can incorporate the structure and function concepts into a lesson. Students build fish from paper plates, decorate them, and learn about the functions of fish fins in the process.

MCR LTER Hosts Booth at 40th Anniversary Earth Day Festival (April 17-18, 2010)

MCR LTER scientists, graduate students, and Outreach staff joined over 200 exhibitors at the Community Environmental Council's 2010 Santa Barbara Earth Day Festival on April 17th and 18th to raise awareness about LTER research and the global health of coral reefs. This year's festival celebrated the 40 year anniversary of Earth Day by expanding to two days and attracted 18,000 people on Saturday and 15,000 on Sunday. Participants were able to stop by to ask questions, view informational posters, make and decorate paper plate fish, and discuss issues with MCR LTER representatives.

Videos Complete First Grade Curriculum (March, 2010)

The first grade curriculum on our Education and Outreach site is now complete, with the addition of two new educational videos. The curriculum is available for download from the Lesson Plan Library. It was created with support from the Research Experience for Teachers (RET) Program and the Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Program of the National Science Foundation (NSF). read more...

Tropical Cyclone Oli 'Bulldozes' Fore Reef (February 4, 2010)

Tropical cyclone Olie passed close to Moorea in early 2010, significantly reducing the cover of live coral on the fore reef and to differing degrees around the island.  This “natural experiment” provides MCR scientists with an unparalleled opportunity to study the processes that influence the recovery of coral reefs from the effects of large disturbances.

Fifth Annual MCR LTER All-Investigator Meeting Gathers at UC Santa Barbara (November 17-18th, 2009)

On November 17-18, 2009, the MCR LTER site held its annual two day investigator meeting. MCR LTER Principal and Associate investigators, postdoctoral scholars, graduate students and technicians met to discuss results of time-series and process studies and to draft the renewal proposal. Highlights of the meeting included poster presentations by graduate students. A meeting of the graduate students was held the day before. To see the group picture, click here.

Local Seventh Grade Teacher Completes Research Experience in Moorea, Curriculum Added to Education and Outreach Site (July, 2009)

This past summer Meghan Saxer, a local seventh grade teacher from Carpinteria Middle School, joined MCR LTER scientists on a research trip to Moorea. Meghan conducted behavioral surveys of fish on snorkel and SCUBA, assisted in coral reef experiments, and got to know the Polynesian culture. Meghan also worked with MCR LTER education staff to create a week-long science unit focusing on coral reef ecology in conjunction with the seventh grade Evolution California State Science Content Standards. The lesson plans, detailed instructor timelines, student worksheets and visual PowerPoint slideshows for this seventh grade curriculum are available for download from the Lesson Plan Library, and were created with support from the Research Experience for Teachers (RET) Program and the Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Program of the National Science Foundation (NSF).

MCR LTER Hosts Booth at 2009 Earth Day Festival (April 19, 2009)

MCR LTER scientists, graduate students, and Outreach staff joined 240 exhibitors at the Community Environmental Council’s 2009 Santa Barbara Earth Day Festival on April 19th to raise awareness about LTER research and the global health of coral reefs. The festival attracted almost 14,000 people, who were able to stop by to ask questions, view informational posters, color pictures of coral reef animals, and discuss issues with MCR LTER representatives.

Local Teacher Leads Marine Biology Research Camp at Gump Research Station on Moorea (March, 2009)

In the Spring of 2009, local high school teacher Craig Didden, from Viewpoint School, and MCR LTER PI Pete Edmunds lead the first Marine Biology Research Camp at the Gump Research Station on Moorea. Fifteen 10-15 year old students from nearby Tahitian classrooms attended a three-day camp that included exercises in conducting experiments and discussions on findings from MCR-related research. Following his experience, Craig shared several high school curriculum ideas on our Education and Outreach site, which are available there to download.

Washington Accelerated Elementary School Field Trip to the REEF (February 17, 2009)

Washington Accelerated Elementary School fourth and fifth graders made the trip on February 17th from Pasadena, CA to the REEF at UCSB in collaboration with the Moorea Coral Reef LTER. The 700 gallon Research Tank at the REEF features a new Coral Reef Exhibit, which acts as a platform to discuss coral reef research and compare coral reef ecosystems to the Californian rocky reefs studied by the Santa Barbara Coastal LTER. Fourth graders at Washington Accelerated learn about coral reefs in the classroom through food web and ecosystem curriculum developed by MCR LTER Education and Outreach staff. This field trip presents a hands-on conclusion to their life science unit. For more information about visiting the REEF, click here.

MCR LTER Site Holds its Fourth All-Investigator Meeting at UC Santa Barbara (November 18th-19th, 2008)

On November 18-19, 2008, the MCR LTER site held its annual two day investigator meeting. MCR LTER Principal and Associate investigators, postdoctoral scholars, graduate students and technicians met to discuss results of monitoring and process studies and to plan upcoming research efforts. Highlights of the meeting included poster presentations by graduate students and postdocs and a lesson plan writing seminar for interested graduate students. To see the group picture, click here.

French Polynesia at a Glance (October, 2008)

If you are curious about Moorea and want to learn more, this fact sheet has all kinds of great information to get you started. read more...

Underwater Guide to Moorea Now Available! (August, 2008)

Scan through our Moorea Coral Reef LTER Research Field Trip guide book to discover what you might see on an SCUBA or snorkel trip on the reefs surrounding Moorea. read more...

The Wild Side: A Mutual Affair (New York Times, April 8, 2008)

I'd like to introduce you to one of my favorite animals: the shrimp goby. These pretty little fish lead lives of enviable indolence. As their name suggests, they live with shrimp (often, a pair). The shrimp build and maintain a burrow. which the goby and shrimp live in together. Each shrimp works hard, shoveling sand out of the front entrance like a miniature bulldozer. As soon as it's delivered the rubble to a suitable distance, it shoots back into its burrow. read more...

MCR LTER PI Alice Alldredge wins prestigious G. Evelyn Hutchinson Award (January, 2008)

The G. Evelyn Hutchinson Award has been presented annually since 1982 to recognize excellence in any aspect of limnology or oceanography. The award is intended to symbolize the quality and innovations toward which the society strives and to remind its members of these goals. Dr. Alldredge was recognized as a scientist who had made considerable contributions to knowledge, and whose future work promised a continuing legacy of scientific excellence. She will receive her award at the annual ASLO (Advancing the Science of Limnology and Oceanograhy) meeting in June of 2008 in St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada.

Sensors, Scientists and Streaming Data (December 4, 2007)

San Diego, CA, Santa Barbara, CA, Madison, WI USA; and Hsinchu, Taiwan, December 4, 2007 -- A wide-ranging collaboration of researchers will develop, improve and deploy tools to support globally-encompassing, grass-roots, community-based research networks studying lake and coral reef ecosystems. They will build cyber- and social infrastructures of sensors, scientists, streaming data and sharing, developing tools with ease of deployment, robustness and stability to enable easily accessed, networked, collaborative ecological science on an international scale. In the process, innovative research will be conducted. read more...

MCR LTER Participates in the third International Conference on Intelligent Sensors, Sensor Networks and Information Technology (December 3-6, 2007)

MCR LTER Investigators Sally Holbrook, Russell Schmitt and Andrew Brooks attended the third meeting of the International Conference on Intelligent Sensors, Sensor Networks and Information Technology held November 3-6, 2007 in Melbourne, Australia. The event, which was run under the umbrella of the ARC Research Network on Sensor Networks, focused on both theory and application of intelligent sensors and smart systems. Sally Holbrook gave a keynote talk addressing the ways that technology development can better meet the logistical and scientific needs of environmental scientists working in marine ecosystems.

Third MCR LTER All-Investigator Meeting a Success (November 6-7, 2007)

On November 6-7, 2007, the MCR LTER site held its third all-investigator meeting at UC Santa Barbara. MCR LTER Principal and Associate investigators, postdoctoral scholars and graduate students met to discuss results of monitoring and process studies and to plan upcoming research efforts. Highlights of the meeting included productive working group breakout sessions and invited talks by our guests from the National Museum of Marine Biology and Aquarium (NMMBA) in Taiwan, Dr. Tung-Yung Fan and his PhD student Pi-Jen Liu. To see the group picture, click here.

Marine Biologists Edmunds and Carpenter Dive Into Coral Reef Study (November, 2007)

Peter Edmunds and Bob Carpenter are featured on the CSUN website! Keep reading for an excerpt from the article: The National Science Foundation (NSF) selected Cal State Northridge and UC Santa Barbara (UCSB) as joint recipients of a $4.6 million, six-year grant to establish a long-term project studying the coral reefs off French Polynesia, the first coral reef Long Term Ecological Research Site supported by the NSF. read more...

MCR LTER Undergraduates Win Best Poster Award at WSN (November, 2007)

MCR LTER undergraduates Jenn Gowan and Stephanie Horii were co-winners of the 2007 Best Student Poster award at the November 8-11 Western Society of Naturalists Annual Meeting in Ventura, California. Ms. Gowan was an undergraduate assistant for MCR LTER graduate student Gerick Bergsma during the summer of 2007. Ms. Horii and MCR LTER graduate student Tom Adam were the recipients of a 2007 Worster Award which helped to fund their research.

Crabs Clean Up, National Geographic Kids Online (August, 2007)

Researchers have discovered that tiny crabs about a third of an inch (one centimeter) long take care of a huge job. They actually help keep coral reefs alive. And that's important, because more than nine million species depend on coral reefs around the world for food and shelter. read more...

MCR LTER Three-Year Review A Success (July, 2007)

Thank you to all those who helped organize this event.

MCR LTER participates in the GLEON 4 Meeting at the Lammi Biological Field Station, Finland (March 2-5, 2007)

MCR LTER Investigator Sally Holbrook attended the fourth meeting of the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON) held March 2-5, 2007 at the Lammi Biological Field Station, Finland. Holbrook represented GLEON’s partner in grass-roots efforts to build international environmental sensor networks, the Coral Reef Environmental Observatory Network (CREON). For more information on the meeting, go to http://gleon.org.

Moorea Coral Reef LTER Sends Delegation to Taiwan (March 1-10, 2007)

Dr. Peter Edmunds (co-PI for MCR-LTER), Gerick Bergmsa, Nichole Price, and Hollie Putnam participated in a collaborative exchange between the MCR LTER and the Taiwan ILTER at the National Museum of Marine Biology and Aquarium (NMMBA) (http://www.nmmba.gov.tw/english/) in the Kenting National Park early this March. Their host, Dr. Tung-Yung Fan, an Associate Research Fellow at NBBMA, timed their arrival with the monthly spawning of several species of cultivated, brooding corals so that we could use the harvested larvae in several preliminary experiments examining the behavior and physiology of settling corals. Hollie Putnam will be returning to southern Taiwan this summer as a participant in the East Asia and Pacific Summer Institutes (EAPSI) (http://www.nsf.gov/eapsi) administered by NSF to work with Dr. Fan. To view the newspaper article, click here...

MCR LTER Investigators Participate in Joint Symposium with CRIOBE Scientists (March 2-4, 2007)

Representatives from the MCR LTER and CRIOBE met over the weekend to discuss potential collaborations. Participants included Serge Planes, Rene Galzin, Yannick Chancerelle and Thierry Lison de Loma from CRIOBE, Neil Davies from Gump Research Station and Giacomo Bernardi, Bob Carpenter, Peter Edmunds, Andy Brooks, Russ Schmitt and Sally Holbrook from the MCR LTER.

MCR LTER Participates in an AIMS Workshop Addressing the Adoption of Sensor Networks by Coastal Managers (December 5, 2006)

Research priorities and water quality programs stress the need for information and systematic monitoring methods to support policy and management strategies in improving capability of detect coral bleaching conditions and minimising the continuous decline in GBR water quality. Collecting real-time data at appropriate temporal and spatial scales is critical to understanding complex marine processes. However, scientific data provided by new technologies often does not fit the needs or interest of managers and decision makers or they are not presented in a way that can be used in a management framework. Andrew Brooks represented the MCR LTER at a recent workshop is designed to address the adaptive deployment of sensor networks in the Great Barrier Reef coast and the delivery of real-time spatial information. To read more, click here...

MCR LTER Site Holds its Second All-Investigator Meeting at UC Santa Barbara (November, 2006)

On November 14-15, 2006, the MCR LTER site held a two day investigator meeting. MCR LTER Principal and Associate investigators, postdoctoral scholars and graduate students met to discuss results of monitoring and process studies and to plan upcoming research efforts. Highlights of the meeting included research presentations by graduate students and postdocs. To see the group picture, click here...

Tiny 'Housekeeper' Crabs Help Prevent Coral Death in the South Pacific (UCSB Press Release, October 23, 2006)

(Santa Barbara, Calif.) - Tiny crabs that live in South Pacific coral help to prevent the coral from dying by providing regular cleaning "services" that may be critical to the life of coral reefs around the world, according to scientists from the University of California, Santa Barbara. read more...

MCR LTER Investigators Participate in the Third GLEON and CREON Joint Workshop (October 3-4, 2006)

The Coral Reef Environmental Observatory Network (CREON) is a collaborating association of scientists and engineers from around the world that is striving to design and build marine sensor networks. It collaborates closely with efforts of an international group of lake scientists (GLEON). Five MCR LTER Investigators (see photo) attended the third GLEON and CLEON joint workshop held at the National Center for High Performance Computing in Hsinchu, Taiwan. read more...

MCR LTER Investigators Participate in Joint Symposium with Kenting Coral Reef ILTER Scientists (October 2, 2006)

A joint symposium between the MCR LTER and Kenting Coral Reef ILTER sites was held at the National Chung Hsing University (N.C.H.U.) in Taichung, Taiwan. The symposium was sponsored by the Environmental Restoration and Disaster Reduction Research Center and the Department of Life Sciences at N.C.H.U., the Research Center for Biodiversity, Academia Sinica and the National Museum of Marine Biology and Aquarium. To read the program, click here...

The Next 25 Years of LTER: Contributions to Understanding Ecological Change (September 20-24, 2006)

A group of 13 MCR LTER investigators attended the 2006 LTER All Scientists Meeting in Estes Park, Colorado on September 20-24th, 2006. Results of MCR research were presented in 18 posters during the meeting. To see the MCR LTER site poster, click here.

Ecological Change, Climate Variation Addressed at International Conference (September 20, 2006)

A research project led by MCR LTER Postdoctoral Fellow Hannah Stewart was featured in a news release by the National Science Foundation that highlighted exciting research being conducted at LTER sites. Stewart's research explores how crabs that live in association with branching corals aid in their survival by clearing damaging sediments. read more...

MCR LTER Brochure Available as PDF (September, 2006)

How and why do coral reef ecosystems change over time? What determines their response to and recovery from disturbance? Check out the Moorea Coral Reef LTER brochure to find out. read more...

Science on the Solstice (NATURE, Vol. 441, 29 June, 2006)

Every day, all over the planet and beyond it, scientists try to make sense of the world in which they live. In this article, Nature presents a composite picture of just one day - 21 June 2006, the Northern Summer Solstice. To read the whole article (Moorea LTER included on the sixth page!), click here...

The Ocean Channel Documents LTER in Moorea, French Polynesia (Ocean Channel Website, June, 2006)

The state of the global ocean is changing, and not for the better. Global warming, rising carbon dioxide levels, over fishing, pollution, coastal development and coastal wetland depletion are but a few of the things threatening the ocean's fragile ecosystem. Coral bleaching, declining fish populations, rising ocean temperatures and water levels, melting arctic ice and an increased numbers of hurricanes and typhoons are some of the evidence of change. Scientists are scrambling to identify specific cause and effect relationships to these and other ocean issues. This evidence of change--attributed to definitive catalysts and going beyond the startling trends--is seen by many as more than enough cause for concern. read more...

Saving the World's Coral Reefs (Profiles in Research, 2005)

Ten miles west of Tahiti's coast is Moorea, a tranquil island where white sand beaches edge a turquoise ocean and deep lagoons, and forests climb slopes of volcanic mountains. But the exotic features that preoccupy marine ecologists Russell Schmitt and Sally Holbrook are the small island's relatively undisturbed coral reefs, built by means of a symbiotic relationship between colonies of tiny marine animals and single-celled photosynthetic algae. read more...

WUWNET06: The First ACM International Workshop on Underwater Networks (September 29, 2006)

The goal of the proposed workshop is to bring together researchers and practitioners in areas relevant to underwater networks. Thus, many layers of the “stack” from the physical layer to the application layer will be represented. The objective is to serve as a forum for presenting state-of-the-art research, exchanging ideas and experiences, and facilitating interaction and collaboration. The workshop will span one day, including presentations of technical papers, tutorial papers, a panel session and a poster/demo session. Submissions for regular technical papers and poster/demo extended abstracts should describe original research, not published or currently under review for other workshops, conferences, or journals. To read more, go to the following address: http://wuwnet.engr.uconn.edu.

MCR LTER Site to Participate in the Coral Reef Environmental Observatory Network (CREON) (January, 2006)

The Coral Reef Environmental Observatory Network (CREON) is a collaborating association of scientists and engineers from around the world that is striving to design and build marine sensor networks. Sensor networks on land are becoming common as new technology enables environmental parameters to be observed in real time and often in several dimensions. Extending this to the marine environment poses many challenges such as fouling and data transmission. The MCR LTER is participating in the initial efforts of the CREON group to share knowledge among research groups and to deploy sensor networks in several locations, including Moorea, the Great Barrier Reef in Australia, and the Kenting Coral Reef ILTER Site in Taiwan. MCR LTER scientists will participate in a CREON workshop in Townsville, Australia, in March 2006. MCR LTER Co-Principal Investigator Sally Holbrook is on the organizing committee for the workshop. To read more about CREON, go to the following address: http://www.coralreefeon.org.

MCR LTER Site Holds All-Investigator Meeting at UC Santa Barbara (November, 2005)

On November 28-29, 2005, the MCR LTER site held a two day investigator meeting. A total of 35 Principal and Associate investigators, postdoctoral scholars and graduate students met to discuss results of monitoring and process studies and to plan upcoming research efforts. Highlights of the meeting included research presentations by six graduate students and two postdocs.

UC Santa Barbara Engineers Collaborate With MCR LTER Investigators to Develop Technology for Wireless Underwater Transmission of Data (August, 2005)

A group of engineers from UC Santa Barbara including Professors Ron Iltis, Hua Lee and Ryan Kastner, is working with a team of investigators from the MCR LTER to develop technology for wireless underwater transmission of data from moored oceanographic instruments. The involves development of an Aqua Modem, which is an underwater acoustic communication device being designed and built by a consortium of UC Santa Barbara and Sonatech, Inc. The goal of the Aqua Modem is to provide a 133 bps data rate with a range of 300 meters. The modem will be incorporated into an Aquanode, which serves to provide a wireless underwater platform for remote eco-sensing. The UC Santa Barbara engineering team is maintaining an Aquanode web site at the following address: http://aquanode.ece.ucsb.edu/Modem/.

Warm Tahitian Welcome to LTER PIs (Les Nouvelles, July, 2005)

Oscar Temaru, President of French Polynesia, welcomes Sally Holbrook and Russ Schmitt, PIs of the Moorea Coral Reef LTER, to a Texas-style barbeque he hosted at the Presidential Palace in Papeete on July 4th, 2005 The occasion was to celebrate both the U.S. Independence Day and the inaugural non-stop flight of Air Tahiti Nui between Tahiti and New York. U.S. citizens working in French Polynesia were treated to an evening of traditional Tahitian dancing and singing in the beautiful gardens of the Presidential Palace. Both President Temaru and Christopher Kosely, United States Consul, gave welcoming addresses. Lead PI Russ Schmitt commented, "It was truly a great honor for us, as representatives of the Moorea Coral Reef LTER, to be included in this celebration and to be so warmly welcomed." read more...

Moorea Roundtable (May 5-6, 2005)

Seven MCR LTER investigators participated in a two-day scientific roundtable meeting in Moorea on May 5-6, 2005. The event was hosted jointly by the Centre de Recherches Insulaires et Observatoire de l'Environnement (CRIOBE) and the UC Berkeley Gump Research Station, and was designed to foster scientific interactions and cooperation among MCR LTER investigators, CRIOBE scientists and representatives and scientists from the Territorial Government and other French agencies. Research talks were given at CRIOBE by MCR LTER and CRIOBE scientists, followed by presentations by individuals representing government agencies and several marine research, monitoring and conservation programs active in French Polynesia. There were roundtable discussions on topics of mutual interest such as data sharing, training and capacity building, and development of funding sources, as well as tours of Gump Research Station’s new laboratory facilities and developing Atitia Center for community outreach and education.

Building Capacity and Linking Infrastructure in the Lake and Coral Reef Scientific Communities (Workshop, March, 2005)

The Moorea Coral Reef LTER is participating in an international effort to develop a scalable coral reef sensor network. MCR LTER scientists have attended two workshops to identify the science questions and research opportunities afforded by a global network, the core variables for sensor measurement, and a five-year plan for implementation of a network. The report of the Coral Reef Working Group for the workshop "Building Capacity and Linking Infrastructure in the Lake and Coral Reef Scientific Communities," held at Scripps Institute of Oceanography in March, 2005 describes the progress to date. Participating LTER and ILTER sites include MCR LTER, the North Temperate Lakes (NTL) LTER, the Taiwan Ecological Research Network (TERN), and ILTER sites that include Kenting Coral Reef and Yuan Yuang Lake. read more...

The UV Lagoon: Where Nanotech Meets Biology... (Convergence, Winter 2005, One)

Most people who have some acquaintance with new science hear "nanotechnology" and probably think small - really small. That's understandable, since nanotech is the science of manipulating matter at the atomic or molecular level, where distance is measured in billionths of a meter. It would seem, too, that the experimental subjects in this realm are too miniscule to see, hear or feel. read more...

Scientists at Sea: Northridge Biologists Helping Endangered Coral Reefs With $4.6 Million Grant (NORTHRIDGE, Winter 2004, No. 40)

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has selected Cal State Northridge and UC Santa Barbara as the joint recipients of an unprecedented $4.6 million, six-year grant to establish a long-term project studying the coral reefs of French Polynesia, near Tahiti, an effort expected to add volumes to scientific understanding of ominous changes in global coral reef communities. read more...

LTER Grows: NSF Awards $10 Million to Ocean Sites for Long-Term Ecological Research (The Network Newsletter Vol. 17 No.2 Fall 2004)

Coral reefs and coastal upwelling ecosystems are the foci of two new LTER sites awarded funding this summer by the National Science Foundation (NSF). With the addition of the California Current Ecosystem (CCE) and the Moorea Coral Reef (MCR) LTER sites, there are now 26 NSF-funded sites in the LTER network. Henry Gholz, director of NSF’s LTER program, noted that the two sites significantly augmented the LTER network, which hitherto included only one marine site—Palmer in the Antarctic. The awards ensure that high biodiversity and productivity ecosystems in most of the world’s major biomes, both on land and in the oceans, are represented. The two newest sites will receive approximately $820,000 for the next six years, for a total of about $5 million each. The following two articles introduce the two newest members of the LTER Network. read more...

NSF Awards $10 Million in Grants to Ocean Sites for Long-Term Ecological Research (NSF Press Release 04-096, July 26, 2004)

ARLINGTON, Va. - Coral reefs and coastal upwelling ecosystems are the subject of two new Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) sites awarded funding by the National Science Foundation (NSF). With the addition of the Moorea Coral Reef LTER Site and the California Current Ecosystem LTER Site, there are now 26 NSF-funded sites in the LTER network. The two newest sites will receive approximately $820,000 for the next six years, for a total of about $5 million each. read more...

 

 
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  NSF LTER logo This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation through the Moorea Coral Reef Long-Term Ecological Research program under Cooperative Agreement #OCE-0417412 and #OCE-1026851. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in the material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation. Moore Foundation logo  
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